Recent Changes

Thursday, June 28

  1. page Portfolio edited ... Tu and Corry Summary Reflection: ... examine the field, field but barely ... the surfa…
    ...
    Tu and Corry Summary
    Reflection:
    ...
    examine the field,field but barely
    ...
    the surface.
    I favored a two pronged approach. Since

    Since
    it is
    ...
    wide and deep: deeplydeep, I favored a two pronged approach. Deeply scrutinize one
    For the sweeping, broad view, we studied one text in depth: Theory and Practice of Online Learning. I expressed my findings and reactions in a variety of formats (both written and narrated presentation) and engaged my classmates in a lively dialog of the topics contain within.
    Throughout this study I encountered new ideas and became more familiar with several I was already acquainted with. One that immediately struck a chord with me was connectivism. Learning has been changing (and is continuing to change). With the assistance of technology, we have nearly instantaneous access to information. We no longer need to fill our brains with facts, we can use them to form connections. As David Allen (productivity guru and author of Getting Things Done) said, “The mind is for having ideas, not holding them.”
    ...
    in education is the change in the role of the instructor.instructor is changing. My mission
    For the narrow view, I researched many scholarly articles on offering one-on-one instruction online. Their field of music instruction typically has very low faculty to student ratios. One of the reasons for this is that applied music instruction (both instrumental and vocal) is still primarily administered via one-on-one face-to-face music lessons. The initial push for online courses seemed to be in larger lecture courses, where the disconnect between teacher and student would be felt less. Because of this, I have seen very little progress (at least at USC) of online music courses. I see similarities to many aspects of audio engineering and production. Many of the tools and techniques require physical demonstrations, high quality audio feedback and instructor guidance. I was curious to see what research I would uncover as I began exploring this topic.
    I did find several somewhat successful implementations of distance applied lessons. One of the primary roadblocks that kept appearing was latency - the time lag in distance communication. Even though this can be less than a second, it drastically affects two musicians trying to play together. Another obstacle that must be worked around is the physical disconnection, e.g. not being able to move a student’s hands to the correct position. While applied music does not lend itself to seamlessly to distance learning, there are still lessons to be learned. Online learning has the ability to foster community, engagement, and interaction in a way that face-to-face learning does not.
    ...
    what has notnot, I hope
    ...
    be a poormere substitute, but rather even better
    Anderson, T. & Elloumi, F. (Eds.). (2008). Theory and Practice of Online Learning, 2nd edition, Athabasca, AB, Canada: Athabasca University.
    http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120146
    ...
    MIT
    Reflection:
    ...
    online course. ThisThe rubric encompassed
    We used this to rubric to evaluate two online courses, one from MIT and the other from Yale. In the Yale course I first firsthand the limitations of trying to repurpose a lecture course for online delivery - the “talking head” doesn’t work by itself. While the professor was engaging and the technology well-done, the course was completely one-way. There needs to be interaction, communication, and community.
    I discovered quite quickly that courses must be DESIGNED for online delivery. They must be purpose built, not simply put online for the sake of being online.
    ...
    LMS Reflection
    Reflection:
    ...
    built on BlackBoard), butBlackBoard). But I had
    Designing, developing, and implementing an online course using a LMS was quite a task - not to mention that had to be ready within a week. We had to make a plan for the design and divide up the work amongst our group. Once again, when we hit a wall in the beginning, ADDIE came to the rescue. We began with an analysis of needs, prospective learners, and our desired outcomes. This definitely focused our design and made the rest of the process flow smoothly.
    Throughout the design and implementation, I could hear portions of the research ringing in my head: planning and structure is important...clear communication is key...build community...engage learners, etc. The material from Theory and Practice of Online Learning was invaluable in our design, helping me plan for community building, fostering interaction, and creating group activities for learners.
    ...
    process I setupset up and tested
    I hope to expand my use of BlackBoard to build community among my students and encourage them to form knowledge networks and create their own meaning. I also hope to use the skills and knowledge I have gained to further develop blended learning and possibly completely online courses. I am exciting to rethink audio engineering education for distance learning.
    (view changes)
    7:04 pm
  2. page Portfolio edited ... BYOD Course LMS Reflection Reflection: Before I became a student in the EdTech program, I …
    ...
    BYOD Course
    LMS Reflection
    Reflection:
    Before I became a student in the EdTech program, I had used the BlackBoard learning management system as an instructor, for traditional courses and only in the most rudimentary way. As a student in online courses, I began to see the potential of an LMS. I experienced community and active knowledge building in discussion forums, saw the ease of group communication, and learned to use various tools such as wikis. This encouraged me to use BlackBoard more as an instructor, so I was somewhat familiar with the CourseSites LMS (which is built on BlackBoard), but I had never build a solely online course.
    Designing, developing, and implementing an online course using a LMS was quite a task - not to mention that had to be ready within a week. We had to make a plan for the design and divide up the work amongst our group. Once again, when we hit a wall in the beginning, ADDIE came to the rescue. We began with an analysis of needs, prospective learners, and our desired outcomes. This definitely focused our design and made the rest of the process flow smoothly.
    Throughout the design and implementation, I could hear portions of the research ringing in my head: planning and structure is important...clear communication is key...build community...engage learners, etc. The material from Theory and Practice of Online Learning was invaluable in our design, helping me plan for community building, fostering interaction, and creating group activities for learners.
    I even learned from the content of our course - in writing the Design a Lesson activity I created an example model. In the process I setup and tested a mobile student polling system that can be accessed thru a website, twitter, and texting. This is something I can use in the classroom and during presentations to engage students or an audience.
    I hope to expand my use of BlackBoard to build community among my students and encourage them to form knowledge networks and create their own meaning. I also hope to use the skills and knowledge I have gained to further develop blended learning and possibly completely online courses. I am exciting to rethink audio engineering education for distance learning.

    (view changes)
    6:54 pm
  3. page Portfolio edited ... Reflection: Research is essential to understanding education. It is vital to see various theo…
    ...
    Reflection:
    Research is essential to understanding education. It is vital to see various theories put forth, contrasted and opposed. And then to see those theories put into practice and tested in real world situations. However, the amount of research in distance education is staggering. It is impossible to deeply examine all of it. One can either to keep a narrow focus and look deeply, or broadly examine the field, but barely scratch the surface.
    ...
    that field.
    For the sweeping, broad view, we studied one text in depth: Theory and Practice of Online Learning. I expressed my findings and reactions in a variety of formats (both written and narrated presentation) and engaged my classmates in a lively dialog of the topics contain within.
    ...
    holding them.”
    As a part of this paradigm shift in education is the change in the role of the instructor. My mission is not to force feed my students material, rather it is to facilitate their ability to build connections and apply information they can easily retrieve. The research outlined the importance of interaction and engagement and methods for encouraging these. I can apply the ideas of connectivism and interaction even to my traditional courses to meet the next generation and help them become life-long learners.
    For the narrow view, I researched many scholarly articles on offering one-on-one instruction online. Their field of music instruction typically has very low faculty to student ratios. One of the reasons for this is that applied music instruction (both instrumental and vocal) is still primarily administered via one-on-one face-to-face music lessons. The initial push for online courses seemed to be in larger lecture courses, where the disconnect between teacher and student would be felt less. Because of this, I have seen very little progress (at least at USC) of online music courses. I see similarities to many aspects of audio engineering and production. Many of the tools and techniques require physical demonstrations, high quality audio feedback and instructor guidance. I was curious to see what research I would uncover as I began exploring this topic.
    ...
    does not.
    With the background of what has worked well and and what has not I hope to make greater inroads into using distance learning in situations that have traditionally relied upon face-to-face one-on-one instruction. With a creation of a learner and mentor community, an always available archive of online lessons, and the ability to offer expert instruction anywhere, perhaps online offerings will no longer be a poor substitute, but even better than face-to-face.
    Anderson, T. & Elloumi, F. (Eds.). (2008). Theory and Practice of Online Learning, 2nd edition, Athabasca, AB, Canada: Athabasca University.
    ...
    MIT
    Reflection:
    The first order of business when evaluating is to determine the ideal and what components go into it. Working as a group we developed a scoring rubric for evaluating learning management systems. This built upon the research I was doing concurrently and caused me to look further into what are the essential components of an online course. This rubric encompassed all aspects of learning management systems, including the design, layout, content, community, and accessibility.
    We used this to rubric to evaluate two online courses, one from MIT and the other from Yale. In the Yale course I first firsthand the limitations of trying to repurpose a lecture course for online delivery - the “talking head” doesn’t work by itself. While the professor was engaging and the technology well-done, the course was completely one-way. There needs to be interaction, communication, and community.
    I discovered quite quickly that courses must be DESIGNED for online delivery. They must be purpose built, not simply put online for the sake of being online.
    Developing the LMS rubric and critiquing other online offerings made me realize that I need to improve the online usage of my face-to-face courses. By making them a blended course, I have the chance to use the online portion to create a community of engaged learners. But I have to be cognizant of and committed to good design practices.

    Goal 3. To construct effective delivery of courses, topics, or training by using existing CMS tools.
    Artifacts:
    (view changes)
    6:23 pm
  4. page OnlineCourseEvalMIT edited MIT OpenCourseWare Visualizing OpenCourseWare: Visualizing Cultures http://bit.ly/j739eA Th…

    MIT OpenCourseWare
    Visualizing
    OpenCourseWare: Visualizing Cultures
    http://bit.ly/j739eA
    The Visualizing Cultures course on MIT OpenCourseWare discusses Commodore Perry’s opening of Japan to trade through images and commentary. Students studied how images have been used as cultural norms and how graphics formed the basis of “visualizing culture”
    ...
    The weaknesses of this course revolve around it not being specifically designed for distance education. It appears to have been a face to face course that was translated to the internet no additional material added to make it a truly online course.
    Our Grading Rubric:
    Course evaluation by Jeff Francis, Jennifer Greene, & Reginald China. Summary written by Jennifer Greene.
    (view changes)
    6:15 pm
  5. page OnlineCourseEvalYale edited Open Yale Course Visualizing CulturesListening Course: Listening to Music Visualizing Cultu…

    Open Yale Course
    Visualizing CulturesListening
    Course: Listening to Music
    Visualizing Cultures--http://bit.ly/j739eAhttp://bit.ly/z4AP6e

    http://bit.ly/z4AP6e

    MUSI 112: Listening to Music is an introductory music course, taught by Dr. Craig Wright. The course is taught as a traditional lecture course with two 50 minute class meetings per week and a weekly section with a Teacher’s Assistant. In the Fall 2008 semester, Dr. Wright’s lectures were recorded for inclusion in the Open Yale Courses. Sections with the TA’s were not recorded.
    Listening to Music focuses on “the development of aural skills that lead to an understanding of Western music” (course syllabus, available online). As can be expected from course with ‘listening’ in the title, musical excerpts are vitally important to the content. There is a companion textbook which includes an audio CD and an additional set of CDs specified as required materials. In addition to attending class lectures and sections, a student is expected listen to these CDs outside of class. Assessment includes written exams, listening exercises, a review of a concert, and a 5-page paper.
    ...
    Listening to Music is essentially an ‘old-school’ face-to-face lecture course that has been video recorded and placed on a website. While it does contain a wealth of material, it is obvious that this course was not rethought or redesigned with online distribution in mind.
    Our Grading Rubric
    Course evaluation by Jeff Francis, Jennifer Greene, & Reginald China. Summary written by Jeff Francis.
    (view changes)
    6:15 pm
  6. page Portfolio edited ... Tu and Corry Summary Reflection: Research is essential to understanding education. It is vi…
    ...
    Tu and Corry Summary
    Reflection:
    Research is essential to understanding education. It is vital to see various theories put forth, contrasted and opposed. And then to see those theories put into practice and tested in real world situations. However, the amount of research in distance education is staggering. It is impossible to deeply examine all of it. One can either to keep a narrow focus and look deeply, or broadly examine the field, but barely scratch the surface.
    I favored a two pronged approach. Since it is impossible to look both wide and deep: deeply scrutinize one source, while taking a cursory look at many others. Or to look at it another way: touch on the overarching field of online learning, while making a concerted investigation of a single topic within that field.
    For the sweeping, broad view, we studied one text in depth: Theory and Practice of Online Learning. I expressed my findings and reactions in a variety of formats (both written and narrated presentation) and engaged my classmates in a lively dialog of the topics contain within.
    Throughout this study I encountered new ideas and became more familiar with several I was already acquainted with. One that immediately struck a chord with me was connectivism. Learning has been changing (and is continuing to change). With the assistance of technology, we have nearly instantaneous access to information. We no longer need to fill our brains with facts, we can use them to form connections. As David Allen (productivity guru and author of Getting Things Done) said, “The mind is for having ideas, not holding them.”
    As a part of this paradigm shift in education is the change in the role of the instructor. My mission is not to force feed my students material, rather it is to facilitate their ability to build connections and apply information they can easily retrieve. The research outlined the importance of interaction and engagement and methods for encouraging these. I can apply the ideas of connectivism and interaction even to my traditional courses to meet the next generation and help them become life-long learners.
    For the narrow view, I researched many scholarly articles on offering one-on-one instruction online. Their field of music instruction typically has very low faculty to student ratios. One of the reasons for this is that applied music instruction (both instrumental and vocal) is still primarily administered via one-on-one face-to-face music lessons. The initial push for online courses seemed to be in larger lecture courses, where the disconnect between teacher and student would be felt less. Because of this, I have seen very little progress (at least at USC) of online music courses. I see similarities to many aspects of audio engineering and production. Many of the tools and techniques require physical demonstrations, high quality audio feedback and instructor guidance. I was curious to see what research I would uncover as I began exploring this topic.
    I did find several somewhat successful implementations of distance applied lessons. One of the primary roadblocks that kept appearing was latency - the time lag in distance communication. Even though this can be less than a second, it drastically affects two musicians trying to play together. Another obstacle that must be worked around is the physical disconnection, e.g. not being able to move a student’s hands to the correct position. While applied music does not lend itself to seamlessly to distance learning, there are still lessons to be learned. Online learning has the ability to foster community, engagement, and interaction in a way that face-to-face learning does not.
    With the background of what has worked well and and what has not I hope to make greater inroads into using distance learning in situations that have traditionally relied upon face-to-face one-on-one instruction. With a creation of a learner and mentor community, an always available archive of online lessons, and the ability to offer expert instruction anywhere, perhaps online offerings will no longer be a poor substitute, but even better than face-to-face.

    Anderson, T. & Elloumi, F. (Eds.). (2008). Theory and Practice of Online Learning, 2nd edition, Athabasca, AB, Canada: Athabasca University.
    http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120146
    (view changes)
    6:07 pm
  7. page LMS Reflection edited ... Overall, CourseSites was fairly easy to setup and configure. I have used an LMS as an instruct…
    ...
    Overall, CourseSites was fairly easy to setup and configure. I have used an LMS as an instructor to some degree in face-to-face courses, so thankfully I was already familiar with learning management systems in a general, and BlackBoard (from which CourseSites is developed) in particular. However, I did not like the way the learning modules flow from one page to another. In edit mode, these modules appear vertically on the same page, but the student views them one at a time on a single page. In addition, when building pages it was often confusing whether the page text would show up on the learning module page or only after the link was accessed. The student interaction involved more clicking and changing of pages than I would have liked. A few days into our build, our group decided we probably would organize it differently next time, but were too deep to change the current course.
    Another difficulty I face was that I wasn’t able to put a course link directly into a particular page’s text. Web links were possible, but not course links. These required a separate page in the learning module. For example, the Design a Lesson activity instructed to learners to host their group project on the CourseSites wiki that was setup for them. I developed and provided an example wiki, so the learners had a model to look at. However, the link to this example wiki was a page by itself, instead of a link directly from the instructions page.
    Since ourBecause the BYOD course was focused on
    ...
    across another problem, which was actually included in our content.problem when I tested mobile access. Well designed
    ...
    additional clicking. I found and included a ‘best practices’ document in our course content.
    Community & Interaction
    The other course designers and I intentionally designed the ‘course’ with interactivity and community in mind. We placed a strong emphasis on the discussion board postings. Learners were expected to proceed through the modules on their own and post their initial findings, then respond to several of their classmates postings. The instructors were also regularly involved in these discussion boards, helping to move the dialog along. While ours was a small, short-lived course, we saw the beginnings of community develop as the students began to interact. We were careful to include as the top discussion board a place for problems, questions, and answers. While no one in our course used it, I went looking for such a forum in the course I participated in as a student. Finding none I emailed the instructors directly and received quick responses from both of them.
    Assignments
    While discussion board postings are important, I wanted the assignments to go beyond this and utilize more of the features of the CourseSites LMS. The Design a Lesson project was designed to incorporate group collaboration on the built-in wiki. In addition, a survey was used for the Collaborative Skills self and peer assessment. Unfortunately, I discovered after the fact that the CourseSites surveys are anonymous and I did not include a “my name” field. Lesson learned.
    Since outour course focusedcentered on the
    Instructor Perspective
    I have experienced group activities in several courses over the past three years, but was always on the inside, as a member of the group. I was surprised to learn that, as an instructor, I had so little idea what was going on in the groups! I could see the groups’ final products; through the CourseSites reports I could see how long the individual members have spent in various portions of the course, but students have the freedom to collaborate through whatever means they choose and the instructor does not have access to all of those means. An instructor must rely on students’ assessments of each other, through something like a Collaborative Skills Rubric. I found the reports capabilities very interesting. This is a feature of BlackBoard/CourseSites that I have not explored in depth. I will need to look at it in more detail in the future.
    (view changes)
    4:44 pm
  8. page Portfolio edited ... Research and Practice in Distance Education Portfolio Goal 1. To be knowledgeable about resea…
    ...
    Research and Practice in Distance Education Portfolio
    Goal 1. To be knowledgeable about research in aspects of distance education and the use of telecommunications in educational and other settings.
    Artifacts:
    Research Synthesis
    Responses to selected chapters from Theory and Practice of Online Learning
    ...
    Chapter 8 Summary
    Tu and Corry Summary
    ReflectionReflection:
    Anderson, T. & Elloumi, F. (Eds.). (2008). Theory and Practice of Online Learning, 2nd edition, Athabasca, AB, Canada: Athabasca University.
    http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120146
    Goal 2. To critically evaluate examples of distance education implementation in educational and business settings.
    Artifacts:
    Online Course Evaluations
    LMS Rubric
    Yale
    MIT
    ReflectionReflection:
    Goal 3. To construct effective delivery of courses, topics, or training by using existing CMS tools.
    Artifacts:
    Online Course Development
    BYOD Course
    (view changes)
    3:50 pm
  9. page Chap08 Summary edited “In-Your-Pocket” and “On-the-Fly:” Meeting the Needs of Today’s New Generation of Online Learner…

    “In-Your-Pocket” and “On-the-Fly:” Meeting the Needs of Today’s New Generation of Online Learners with Mobile Learning Technology
    Group Discussion Summary
    “In-Your-Pocket” and “On-the-Fly:” Meeting the Needs of Today’s New Generation of Online Learners with Mobile Learning Technology
    Google Docs
    Article: Anderson, T. & Elloumi, F. (Eds.). (2008). Theory and Practice of Online Learning, 2nd edition, Athabasca, AB, Canada: Athabasca University.

    (view changes)
    3:44 pm
  10. page Chap08 Summary edited “In-Your-Pocket” and “On-the-Fly:” Meeting the Needs of Today’s New Generation of Online Learner…

    “In-Your-Pocket” and “On-the-Fly:” Meeting the Needs of Today’s New Generation of Online Learners with Mobile Learning Technology
    Group Discussion Summary
    Google Docs

    (view changes)
    3:42 pm

More